ROMAINE LEAVES


Romaine leaves minimally processed, cut, washed, disinfected, and ready to eat. Romaine leaves should be firm, without damage to ribs, and should have uniform color without visible defects.

FRESH AND FROZEN

Romaine leaves minimally processed, cut, washed, disinfected, and ready to eat. Romaine leaves should be firm, without damage to ribs, and should have uniform color without visible defects.

Can you eat lettuce after its frozen?

But, other vegetables, like lettuce and cucumbers, have a lot of water in them and more delicate cell walls. The ice crystals damage these vegetables so badly that they really can‘t be frozen without turning into mush. Ice crystals can reduce almost any vegetable to mush if poor freezing technique is used.

Can you freeze salad leaves?

Not if you want to make tossed salad with the thawed out product. But for cooking and flavoring uses, yes, you can freeze lettuce. The reason you won’t be able to use the frozen lettuce to make salads is because the freezing process causes ice crystals to form in plant cells.

Can you freeze shredded lettuce?

However, you can certainly freeze lettuce, but because lettuce leaves are full of water, ice crystals will form and change the texture. Iceberg lettuce, which contain around 96% of water, will certainly not be ideal for salads after it has been thawed. This doesn’t mean mean that frozen lettuce can‘t be used.

Can you freeze romaine lettuce?

We can only get them in 3 head bags here and that is too much for our use (I likeromaine salads, wife doesn’t). No you can not freeze lettuce. Lettuce is mostly water and when the water freezes it destroys the cell walls of the lettuce. When it thaws out it will be a mushy mess and not something you will want to eat.

STORAGE.

Romaine leaves should be refrigerated. Keep away from vegetables and fruits that produce ethylene to prevent ripening.
  • Optimal storage temperature: 34°F to 40° F
  • Relative humidity: 95 to 100%
  • Produces ethylene: No
  • Sensitive to ethylene exposure: Yes

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